Layout example ....

Multi-page A-Z, single column layout with folder names and sorted by folder names.

 A   B    C    D   E  F   G    H   I   J    K    L    M   N   O    P   Q   R    S    T   U   V    W   X  Y  Z  # 
 
Scott
Coronach
by Sir Walter Scott
Coronach by Sir Walter Scott He is gone on the mountain, He is lost to the forest, Like a summer-dried fountain, When our need was the sorest. The f
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Scott/coronach.htm
 
Gathering Song of Donald the Black
by Sir Walter Scott
Gathering Song of Donald the Black by Sir Walter Scott Pibroch of Donuil Dhu Pitbroch of Donuil Wake thy wild voice anew, Summon Clan Conuil. Come a
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Scott/gathering_song_of_donald_the_black.htm
 
Lochinvar
by Sir Walter Scott
Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott O, young Lochinvar is come out of the west, Through all the wide Border his steed was the best; And save his good broa
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Scott/lochinvar.htm
 
The Rover
by Sir Walter Scott
The Rover by Sir Walter Scott ‘A weary lot is thine, fair maid, A weary lot is thine! To pull the thorn thy brow to braid, And press the rue for win
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Scott/the_rover.htm
 
Shakespeare
Ariel's Songs
by William Shakespeare
Ariel's Songs by William Shakespeare (i) Come unto these yellow sands, And then take hands: Curtsied when you have, and kissed The wild waves whist,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Shakespeare/ariel's_songs.htm
 
Shelley
Ode to a Skylark
by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Ode to a Skylark by Percy Bysshe Shelley Hail to thee, blithe Spirit! Bird thou never wert - That from Heaven or near it Pourest thy full heart In p
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Shelley/ode_to_a_skylark.htm
 
Ode to the West Wind
by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley I O Wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being, Thou from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Shelley/ode_to_the_west_wind.htm
 
Ozymandias
by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: 'Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert . . .
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Shelley/ozymandias.htm
 
The Mask of Anarchy
by Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Mask of Anarchy Written on the occasion of the massacre at Manchester. by Percy Bysshe Shelley As I lay asleep in Italy There came a voice from
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Shelley/the_mask_of_anarchy.htm
 
Skelton
How the Doughty Duke of Albany...
by John Skelton
How the Doughty Duke of Albany like a Coward Knight ran away shamefully with an Hundred Thousand Tratling Scots and Fainthearted Frenchmen, beside t
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Skelton/how_the_doughty_duke_of_albany___.htm
 
Philip Sparrow
by John Skelton
Philip Sparrow by John Skelton PLA ce bo! Who is there, who? Di le xi! Dame Margery, Fa, re, my, my. Wherefore and why, why? For the soul of Philip
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Skelton/philip_sparrow.htm
 
The Requiem Mass
by John Skelton
The Requiem Mass by John Skelton Lauda, anima mea, Dominum! To weep with me look that ye come All manner of birdės in your kind; See none be le
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Skelton/the_requiem_mass.htm
 
Southey
Gooseberry-Pie
by Robert Southey
Gooseberry-Pie by Robert Southey A PINDARIC ODE 1 Gooseberry-Pie is best. Full of the theme, O Muse, begin the song! What though the sunbeams of the
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/gooseberry-pie.htm
 
The Battle of Bleinheim
by Robert Southey
The Battle of Blenheim by Robert Southey 1 It was a summer evening, Old Kaspar's work was done, And he before his cottage door Was sitting in the su
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_battle_of_bleinheim.htm
 
The Ebb Tide
by Robert Southey
The Ebb Tide by Robert Southey Slowly thy flowing tide Came in, old Avon! scarcely did mine eyes, As watchfully I roam'd thy green-wood side, Percei
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_ebb_tide.htm
 
The Inchcape Rock
by Robert Southey
The Inchcape Rock by Robert Southey An older writer mentions a curious tradition which may be worth quoting. ‘By east the Isle of May', says he, ‘tw
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_inchcape_rock.htm
 
The Old Man's Comforts
by Robert Southey
The Old Man's Comforts by Robert Southey AND HOW HE GAINED THEM You are old, Father William the young man cried, The few locks which are left you ar
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_old_man's_comforts.htm
 
Spenser
Prothalamion
by Edmund Spenser
Prothalamion by Edmund Spenser Calm was the day, and through the trembling air Sweet-breathing Zephyrus did softly play― A gentle spirit, that
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Spenser/prothalamion.htm
 
The Bower of Bliss
by Edmund Spenser
The Bower of Bliss From The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser Eftsoones they heard a most melodious sound, Of all that mote delight a daintie eare, Su
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Spenser/the_bower_of_bliss.htm
 
Whilst it is Prime
by Edmund Spenser
Whilst it is Prime by Edmund Spenser Fresh Spring, the herald of love's mighty king, In whose cote-armour richly are displayed All sorts of flowers,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Spenser/whilst_it_is_prime.htm
 
Swift
A Description of the Morning
by Jonathan Swift
A Description of the Morning by Jonathan Swift Now hardly here and there a Hackney-coach Appearing, show'd the ruddy morn's approach. Now Betty from
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Swift/A Description of the Morning.htm
 
verses on the death of Dr Swift
by Jonathan Swift
Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift, D.S.P.D. by Jonathan Swift Occasioned by reading a Maxim in Rochefoucauld. As Rochefoucauld his Maxim drew From na
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Swift/verses_on_the_death_of_dr_swift.htm
 
Swinburne
A Forsaken Garden
by Algernon Charles Swinburne
A Forsaken Garden by Algernon Charles Swinburne In a coign of the cliff between lowland and highland, At the sea-down's edge between windward and le
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Swinburne/a_forsaken_garden.htm
 
The Garden of Proserpine
by Algernon Charles Swinburne
The Garden of Proserpine by Algernon Charles Swinburne Here, where the world is quiet ; Here, where all trouble seems Dead winds' and spent waves' r
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Swinburne/the_garden_of_proserpine.htm