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Burns   Tam O'Shanter
by Robert Burns
Tam O'Shanter by Robert Burns A Tale Of Brownyis and of Bogillis full is this Buke. GAWIN DOUGLAS When chapman billies leave the street, And drouthy
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/tam_o'shanter.htm

Tam O'Shanter
by Robert Burns
Tam O'Shanter by Robert Burns A Tale Of Brownyis and of Bogillis full is this Buke. GAWIN DOUGLAS When chapman billies leave the street, And drouthy
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/tam_o'shanter-2.htm

Tennyson   Tears, Idle Tears
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Tears, Idle Tears by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean, Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the hea
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Tennyson/tears,_idle_tears.htm

Gray   The Bard
by Thomas Gray
The Bard by Thomas Gray I. 1 ‘Ruin seize thee, ruthless king! Confusion on thy banners wait, Though fanned by Conquest's crimson wing They mock the
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Gray/the_bard.htm

Southey   The Battle of Bleinheim
by Robert Southey
The Battle of Blenheim by Robert Southey 1 It was a summer evening, Old Kaspar's work was done, And he before his cottage door Was sitting in the su
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_battle_of_bleinheim.htm

Spenser   The Bower of Bliss
by Edmund Spenser
The Bower of Bliss From The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser Eftsoones they heard a most melodious sound, Of all that mote delight a daintie eare, Su
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Spenser/the_bower_of_bliss.htm

Hood   The Bridge of Sighs
by Thomas Hood
The Bridge of Sighs by Thomas Hood One more Unfortunate Weary of breath, Rashly importunate, Gone to her death ! Take her up tenderly, Lift her with
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hood/the_bridge_of_sighs.htm

Tennyson   The Brook
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Brook by Alfred, Lord Tennyson I come from haunts of coot and hern I make a sudden sally, And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valle
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Tennyson/The Brook.htm

Hopkins   The Caged Skylark
by Gerard Manley Hopkins
The Caged Skylark by Gerard Manley Hopkins As a dare-gale skylark scanted in a dull cage Man's mounting spirit in his bone-house, mean house, dwells
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hopkins/the_caged_skylark.htm

Cowper   The Castaway
by William Cowper
The Castaway by William Cowper Obscurest night involved the sky, The Atlantic billows roared, When such a destined wretch as I, Washed headlong from
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Cowper/castaway.htm

Tennyson   The Charge of the Light Brigade
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Tennyson/the_charge_of_the_light_brigade.htm

William blake   The Clod and the Pebble
by William Blake
The Clod & the Pebble by William Blake ‘Love seeketh not Itself to please, ‘Nor for itself hath any care; ‘But for another gives its ease, ‘And
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/william_blake/the_clod_and_the_pebble.htm

Burns   The Cotter's Saturday Night
by Robert Burns
The Cotter's Saturday Night by Robert Burns INSCRIBED TO R. AIKEN, ESQ. Let not Ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys, and destiny obsc
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/the_cotter's_saturday_night.htm

The Cotter's Saturday Night
by Robert Burns
The Cotter's Saturday Night by Robert Burns INSCRIBED TO R. AIKEN, ESQ. Let not Ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys, and destiny obsc
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/the_cotter's_saturday_night-2.htm

Hardy   The Darkling Thrush
by Thomas Hardy
The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy I leant upon a coppice gate When Frost was spectre-gray, And Winter's dregs made desolate The weakening eye of d
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hardy/The Darkling Thrush.htm

Hood   The Death Bed
by Thomas Hood
The Death Bed by Thomas Hood We watch'd her breathing thro' the night, Her breathing soft and low, As in her breast the wave of life Kept heaving to
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hood/the_death_bed.htm

Goldsmith   The Deserted Village
by Oliver Goldsmith
The Deserted Village by Oliver Goldsmith Sweet Auburn, loveliest village of the plain, Where health and plenty cheared the labouring swain, Where sm
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Goldsmith/the_deserted_village.htm

Pope   The Dunciad Book the First
by Alexander Pope
The Dunciad Book the First by Alexander Pope The Mighty Mother, and her son who brings The Smithfield muses to the ear of kings, I sing. Say you, he
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Pope/the_dunciad_book_the_first.htm

Kipling   The Dykes
by Rudyard Kipling
The Dykes by Rudyard Kipling We have no heart for the fishing―we have no hand for the oar― All that our fathers taught us of old pleases
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Kipling/the_dykes.htm

Tennyson   The Eagle
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Eagle by Alfred, Lord Tennyson He clasps the crag with crooked hands ; Close to the sun in lonely lands, Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Tennyson/The_Eagle.htm

Southey   The Ebb Tide
by Robert Southey
The Ebb Tide by Robert Southey Slowly thy flowing tide Came in, old Avon! scarcely did mine eyes, As watchfully I roam'd thy green-wood side, Percei
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_ebb_tide.htm

Byron   The Eve of Waterloo
by Lord Byron
The Eve of Waterloo by Lord Byron There was a sound of revelry by night, And Belgium's Capital had gathered then Her Beauty and her Chivalry, and br
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Byron/the_eve_of_waterloo.htm

William blake   The Fly
by William Blake
The Fly by William Blake Little Fly, Thy summer's play My thoughtless hand Has brush'd away. Am not I A fly like thee? Or art not thou A man like me
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/william_blake/The Fly.htm

Swinburne   The Garden of Proserpine
by Algernon Charles Swinburne
The Garden of Proserpine by Algernon Charles Swinburne Here, where the world is quiet ; Here, where all trouble seems Dead winds' and spent waves' r
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Swinburne/the_garden_of_proserpine.htm

Kipling   The Gods of the Copybook Headings
by Rudyard Kipling
The Gods of the Copybook Headings by Rudyard Kipling As I pass through my incarnations in every age and race. I make my proper prostrations to the G
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Kipling/the_gods_of_the_copybook_headings.htm

Southey   The Inchcape Rock
by Robert Southey
The Inchcape Rock by Robert Southey An older writer mentions a curious tradition which may be worth quoting. ‘By east the Isle of May', says he, ‘tw
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_inchcape_rock.htm

Byron   The Isles of Greece
by Lord Byron
The Isles of Greece by Lord Byron The isles of Greece ! the isles of Greece Where burning Sappho loved and sung, Where grew the arts of war and peac
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Byron/the_isles_of_greece.htm

Tennyson   The Lady of Shalott
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
The Lady of Shalott by Alfred, Lord Tennyson PART I On either side the river lie Long fields of barley and of rye, That clothe the wold and meet the
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Tennyson/The Lady of Shalott.htm

Browning   The Lost Leader
by Robert Browning
The Lost Leader by Robert Browning Just for a handful of silver he left us, Just for a riband to stick in his coat - Found the one gift of which for
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Browning/the_lost_leader.htm

Shelley   The Mask of Anarchy
by Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Mask of Anarchy Written on the occasion of the massacre at Manchester. by Percy Bysshe Shelley As I lay asleep in Italy There came a voice from
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Shelley/the_mask_of_anarchy.htm

Hopkins   The May Magnificat
by Gerard Manley Hopkins
The May Magnificat by Gerard Manley Hopkins May is Mary's month, and I Muse at that and wonder why : Her feasts follow reason, Dated due to season—
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hopkins/the_may_magnificat.htm

Housman   The Merry Guide
by A.E. Housman
The Merry Guide by A.E. Housman Once in the wind of morning I ranged the thymy wold; The world-wide air was azure And all the brooks ran gold. There
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Housman/the_merry_guide.htm

Blunden   The Midnight Skaters
by Edmund Blunden
The Midnight Skaters by Edmund Blunden The hop-poles stand in cones, The icy pond lurks under, The pole-tops steeple to the thrones Of stars, sound
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Blunden/the_midnight_skaters.htm

Lawrence   The Mosquito
by D.H. Lawrence
The Mosquito by D.H. Lawrence When did you start your tricks, Monsieur ? What do you stand on such high legs for ? Why this length of shredded shank
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Lawrence/the_mosquito.htm

Thomas E   The New House
by Edward Thomas
The New House by Edward Thomas Now first, as I shut the door, I was alone In the new house ; and the wind Began to moan. Old at once was the house,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Thomas E/the_new_house.htm

Hunt   The Nile
by James Leigh Hunt
The Nile by James Leigh Hunt It flows through old hushed Egypt and its sands, Like some grave mighty thought threading a dream, And times and things
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hunt/the_nile.htm

Keats   The Nile
by John Keats
The Nile by James Leigh Hunt It flows through old hushed Egypt and its sands, Like some grave mighty thought threading a dream, And times and things
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Keats/the_nile.htm

Ralegh   The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd
by Sir Walter Ralegh
The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd by Sir Walter Ralegh If all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty plea
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Ralegh/the_nymph's_reply_to_the_shepherd.htm

Lamb   the old familiar faces
by Charles Lamb
The Old Familiar Faces by Charles Lamb I have had playmates, I have had companions, In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days, All, all are
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Lamb/the_old_familiar_faces.htm

Southey   The Old Man's Comforts
by Robert Southey
The Old Man's Comforts by Robert Southey AND HOW HE GAINED THEM You are old, Father William the young man cried, The few locks which are left you ar
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Southey/the_old_man's_comforts.htm

Kipling   The Old Men
by Rudyard Kipling
The Old Men by Rudyard Kipling This is our lot if we live so long and labour unto the end― That we outlive the impatient years and the much to
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Kipling/The Old Men.htm

Thomas E   The Owl
by Edward Thomas
The Owl by Edward Thomas Downhill I came, hungry, and yet not starved ; Cold, yet had heat within me that was proof Against the North wind ; tired,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Thomas E/the_owl.htm

Cowper   The Poplar-Field
by William Cowper
The Poplar-Field (1784) by William Cowper The poplars are fell'd, farewell to the shade And the whispering sound of the cool colonnade, The winds pl
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Cowper/the_poplar-field.htm

Wordsworth   The Prelude
by William Wordsworth
The Prelude (an extract) by William Wordsworth (I) Childhood Fair seed-time had my soul, and I grew up Fostered alike by beauty and by fear : Much f
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Wordsworth/the_prelude.htm

Byron   The Prisoner of Chillon
by Lord Byron
The Prisoner of Chillon (an extract from) by Lord Byron A kind of change came in my fate, My keepers grew compassionate ; I know not what had made t
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Byron/the_prisoner_of_chillon.htm

Pope   The Rape of the Lock Canto 1
by Alexander Pope
The Rape of the Lock Canto 1 by Alexander Pope What dire offence from amorous causes springs, What mighty contests rise from trivial things, I sing—
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Pope/the_rape_of_the_lock_canto_1.htm

Poe   The Raven
by Edgar Allen Poe
The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Poe/raven.htm

Skelton   The Requiem Mass
by John Skelton
The Requiem Mass by John Skelton Lauda, anima mea, Dominum! To weep with me look that ye come All manner of birdės in your kind; See none be le
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Skelton/the_requiem_mass.htm

Vaughan   The Retreat
by Henry Vaughan
The Retreat by Henry Vaughan Happy those early days, when I Shined in my angel-infancy ! Before I understood this place Appointed for my second race
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Vaughan/The Retreat.htm

Coleridge   The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge PART I It is an ancient Mariner And he stoppeth one of three. ‘By thy long grey beard and
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Coleridge/the_rime_of_the_ancient_mariner.htm

Campbell   The River of Life
by Thomas Campbell
The River of Life by Thomas Campbell The more we live, more brief appear Our life's succeeding stages: A day to childhood seems a year, And years li
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Campbell/the_river_of_life.htm

Hardy   The Robin
by Thomas Hardy
The Robin by Thomas Hardy When up aloft I fly and fly, I see in pools The shining sky, And a happy bird Am I, am I! When I descend Toward the brink
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hardy/The_Robin.htm

Scott   The Rover
by Sir Walter Scott
The Rover by Sir Walter Scott ‘A weary lot is thine, fair maid, A weary lot is thine! To pull the thorn thy brow to braid, And press the rue for win
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Scott/the_rover.htm

Hopkins   The Sea and the Skylark
by Gerard Manley Hopkins
The Sea and the Skylark by Gerard Manley Hopkins On ear and ear noises too old to end Trench― right, the tide that ramps against the shore; Wi
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hopkins/The_Sea_and_the_Skylark.htm

Owen   The Send-Off
by Wilfred Owen
The Send-Off by Wilfred Owen Down the close, darkening lanes they sang their way To the siding-shed, And lined the train with faces grimly gay. Thei
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Owen/the_send-off.htm

The Sentry
by Wilfred Owen
The Sentry by Wilfred Owen We'd found an old Boche dug-out, and he knew, And gave us hell, for shell on frantic shell Hammered on top, but never qui
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Owen/the_sentry.htm

Hogg   The Skylark
by James Hogg
The Skylark by James Hogg Bird of the wilderness, Blithesome and cumberless, Sweet be thy matin o'er moorland and lea! Emblem of happiness, Blest is
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hogg/the_skylark.htm

Wordsworth   The Solitary Reaper
by William Wordsworth
The Solitary Reaper by William Wordsworth Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass ! Reaping and singing by herself ; Stop here,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Wordsworth/the_solitary_reaper.htm

Donne   The Sun Rising
by John Donne
The Sun Rising by John Donne Busy old fool, unruly Sun, Why dost thou thus, Through windows and through curtains call on us ? Must to thy motions lo
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Donne/the_sun_rising.htm

William blake   The Tyger
by William Blake
The Tyger by William Blake Tyger ! Tyger ! Burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry ?
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/william_blake/The Tyger.htm

Vaughan   The Waterfall
by Henry Vaughan
The Waterfall by Henry Vaughan With what deep murmurs through time's silent stealth Doth thy transparent, cool, and watery wealth Here flowing fall,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Vaughan/the_waterfall.htm

Kipling   The Way Through the Woods
by Rudyard Kipling
The Way Through the Woods by Rudyard Kipling They shut the road through the woods Seventy years ago. Weather and rain have undone it again, And now
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Kipling/The Way Through the Woods.htm

The White Man's Burden
by Rudyard Kipling
The White Man's Burden by Rudyard Kipling (The United States and the Philippine Islands) Take up the White Man's burden― Send forth the best y
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Kipling/the_white_man's_burden.htm

Chaucer   The Wife of Bath's Tale
by Geoffrey Chaucer
The Wife of Bath's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer In th'olde dayes of King Arthour, Of which that Britons speken greet honour, Al was this land fulfild of
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Chaucer/the_wife_of_bath's_tale.htm

Vaughan   The World
by Henry Vaughan
The World by Henry Vaughan I saw Eternity the other night Like a great Ring of pure and endless light, All calm as it was bright ; And round beneath
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Vaughan/the_world.htm

Wordsworth   The world is too much with us
by William Wordsworth
The world is too much with us by William Wordsworth The world is too much with us ; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers : L
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Wordsworth/the_world_is_too_much_with_us.htm

Hopkins   The Wreck of the Deutschland
by Gerard Manley Hopkins
The Wreck of the Deutschland by Gerard Manley Hopkins To the happy memory of five Franciscan nuns exiles by the Falk Laws drowned between midnight a
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Hopkins/the_wreck_of_the_deutschland.htm

Marvell   Thoughts in a Garden
by Andrew Marvell
Thoughts in a Garden by Andrew Marvell How vainly men themselves amaze To win the palm, the oak, or bays, And their incessant labours see Crown'd fr
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Marvell/thoughts_in_a_garden.htm

Tennyson   Tithonus
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Tithonus by Alfred, Lord Tennyson The woods decay, the woods decay and fall, The vapours weep their burthen to the ground, Man comes and tills the f
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Tennyson/tithonus.htm

Whitman   To a Locomotive in Winter
by Walt Whitman
To a Locomotive in Winter by Walt Whitman Thee for my recitative, Thee in the driving storm even as now, the snow, the winter-day declining, Thee in
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Whitman/to_a_locomotive_in_winter.htm

Burns   To a Louse
by Robert Burns
To a Louse by Robert Burns ON SEEING ONE ON A LADY'S BONNET AT CHURCH 1. Ha! whare ye gaun, ye crowlin ferlie ? Your impudence protects you sairly,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/to_a_louse.htm

to a mountain daisy
by Robert Burns
To a Mountain Daisy by Robert Burns ON TURNING ONE DOWN WITH THE PLOUGH IN APRIL 1786 1 Wee, modest, crimson-tippèd flow'r, Thou's met me in an evil
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/to_a_mountain_daisy.htm

To a Mouse
by Robert Burns
To a Mouse by Robert Burns ON TURNING HER UP IN HER NEST WITH THE PLOUGH, NOVEMBER 1785 1. Wee, sleekit, cowrin, tim'rous beastie, O, what a panic's
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Burns/to_a_mouse.htm

Jonson   To Celia
by Ben Jonson
To Celia by Ben Jonson Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine ; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I'll not look for wine. Th
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Jonson/To Celia.htm

Herrick   To Daffodils
by Robert Herrick
To Daffodils by Robert Herrick Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon ; As yet the early-rising sun Has not attain'd his noon. Stay,
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Herrick/to_daffodils.htm

Marvell   To His Coy Mistress
by Andrew Marvell
To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, Lady, were no crime. We would sit down and think which way To
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Marvell/to_his_coy_mistress.htm

Campbell   To the Evening Star
by Thomas Campbell
To the Evening Star by Thomas Campbell Gem of the crimson-colour'd Even, Companion of retiring day, Why at the closing gates of heaven, Beloved Star
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Campbell/to_the_evening_star.htm

Dryden   To the Memory of Mr Oldham
by John Dryden
To the Memory of Mr Oldham by John Dryden Farewell, too little and too lately known, Whom I began to think and call my own; For sure our souls were
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Dryden/to_the_memory_of_mr_oldham.htm

Herrick   To The Virgins
by Robert Herrick
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time by Robert Herrick Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying: And this same flower that smiles
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Herrick/to_the_virgins.htm

Kipling   Tommy
by Rudyard Kipling
Tommy by Rudyard Kipling I went into a public-'ouse to get a pint o' beer, The publican 'e up an' sez, "We serve no red-coats here." The g
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Kipling/tommy.htm

Rossetti C   Twice
by Christina Rossetti
Twice by Christina Rossetti I took my heart in my hand (O my love, O my love), I said : Let me fall or stand, Let me live or die, But this once hear
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Rossetti C/twice.htm

Browning   Two in the Campagna
by Robert Browning
Two in the Campagna by Robert Browning I wonder do you feel to-day As I have felt since, hand in hand, We sat down on the grass, to stray In spirit
http://www.withinweb.com/thesitemapper/classical_poets/Browning/two_in_the_campagna.htm